Tilia

An easily recognized genus of trees, the inflorescence with peduncle adnate about half its length to a subtending tongue-shaped bract, which soon becomes twisted with the weight of the inflorescence so that the latter hangs beneath the bract. The cordate leaves in most species, including our only native one, are asymmetrical (oblique) at the base, one basal lobe being larger than the other. Several European species and hybrids, generally with smaller leaves than in T. americana, are planted as shade trees. Tilia is one of the few forest trees in our latitude to have flowers visited heavily by bees, and basswood honey is considered excellent.

1. Larger leaves mostly 7–12 cm wide; leaves lacking brownish tufts of hair in the axils of the main veins at the junction with the petiole.

T. americana

1. Larger leaves mostly 4–7 cm wide; with brownish tufts of hair in the axils of the main veins at the junction with the petiole.

T. cordata

All species found in Tilia

Tilia americanaBASSWOOD, LINDEN 
Tilia cordataLITTLE-LEAF LINDEN 

Citation:

MICHIGAN FLORA ONLINE. A. A. Reznicek, E. G. Voss, & B. S. Walters. February 2011. University of Michigan. Web. July 26, 2017. http://michiganflora.net/genus.aspx?id=Tilia.